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Fifty Years among Authors, Books and Publishers

Derby, J.C. Fifty Years among Authors, Books and Publishers. New York: G. W. Carleton and Co., 1884.
Type: 
book
Genre: 
history
Abstract: 

Derby discusses the histories of various American publishing houses and their relationships to several of the prominent authors of the time. The book is also a personal and professional memoir for Derby which discusses his introductions to and friendships with several writers and literary figures.

People Mentioned in this Work

Aldrich, Thomas [pages:34,35,222,227-234,239,251,603]

Early in his publishing career, Derby hired Aldrich as an assistant reader (34). Aldrich was also one of the writers gathered at the complimentary fruit and flower festival held for distinguished authors by New York publishers at the Crystal Palace in 1855 (35).

Derby recalls meeting Aldrich for the first time when Aldrich was seventeen (in 1854) and seeking a publisher for his first volume of verses. Derby advised Aldrich to submit his MS. to his reader, George Ripley, the literary critic at the Tribune, as "it was commercially hazardous for publishers to risk their money in publishing volumes of poetry, especially of a beginner and one so young as he" (227). Derby notes that Aldrich "now ranks among our best American poets" (227). The Bells, by T.B.A., as it was first published received a "decidedly favorable" opinion from the reader, which prompted the publication. According to Derby, this first volume was neither a commercial nor a critical success (228).

Derby also tells the story of Aldrich's the Ballad of Baby Bell, published in 1856 by G.W. Carelton, which Derby notes "became very popular and is now included in a beautifully illustrated collection of the author's complete poetical writings just published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co" (229). Aldrich met Fitz Greene Halleck through Frederick S. Cozzens after the poem caught Cozzens's attention (229).

Aldrich's first job in the literary world was writing literary notices in The New York Evening Mirror (230).

Some poems Aldrich submitted the The Home Journal caught the attention of N. P. Willis, the editor, who "introduced [the poems] to its readers in a very flattering manner. A habit Mr. Willis always indulged in, when young writers sent in contributions in prose or poetry, that he really liked" (230). After this, Willis suggested to his partner Gen. Geo. P. Morris that he go see Aldrich and hire him as an assitant editor (230).
According to Derby, Willis usually came to the city only twice a month during this period, spending most of his time at his home at Idle-Wild. Aldrich was working at The Home Journal six months before he met Willis (230-231). Derby writes of their first meeting: "One day as he sat in the editorial sanctum, stretched out on three chairs, each foot on a chair, placidly smoking a cigar and lazily looking over the exchanges, he was startled by the sudden appearance of a tall, pleasant looking gentleman, who said, 'Is this Mr. Aldrich? My name is Willis.' The young autocrat of an editor was very much embarassed for the moment, but the famous poet, who was a man of the world, took the situation in at once, and soon put him entirely at ease. In less than five minutes, the young editor felt as if he had known the editor-in-chief all his life" (231). Before Aldrich occupied his desk at The Home Journal, James Aldrich (no relation), Poe, and James Parton, had worked at the same desk; "It was a curious fact and tradition in the Home Journal office, that the same desk shold have been occupied by tehse three distinugished authors, Poe, Parton, and Aldrich" (231). Aldrich stayed at The Home Journal for about three years, until he became involved in the Saturday Press (231-232). Derby writes about how, during his association with the Saturday Press, Aldrich frequently missed receiving the advertising revenues because of his habit of sleeping later than Clapp (232).

Shortly after his association with the Saturday Press, Aldrich became associated with the Atlantic Monthly (232). After Howells's retirement in 1880, "for the past four years this great exponent of the best literature of the day, now the property of its present publishers, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., has been under the exclusive editorial control of Mr. Aldrich" (232).

Derby also notes that Aldrich's works "whether prose or poetry, have a steady and increasing sale" (233).

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians" (239).

Arnold, George [pages:232]

He is listed as one of the "associates" of the Saturday Press. Derby notes that he is deceased at the time of his writing (232).

Bellew, Frank [pages:239]

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians" (239).

Briggs, Charles [pages:239,312,354]

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians." Derby notes that his pen name was "Harry Franco" (239).

Parke Godwin and Briggs were the first co-editors of Putnam's Monthly Magazine in 1852 (312).

Briggs was also one of the "brilliant corps of assistant editors" hired by Henry J. Raymond of the Times in 1852, when the paper was able to double its size. Many of these editors were also the authors of books (354).

Brougham, John [pages:236]

Derby mentions Brougham's "The Lantern" (then edited by Brougham, also an actor) as one of the "humorous papers and periodicals of the day" to which George W. Carleton (later a publisher and bookseller) submitted and had published several illustrations that he did in in leisure time (236).

Butler, William [pages:236-238]

Derby writes that one of George W. Carleton's early publications as a publisher was "that celebrated society poem, by William Allen Butler, then and now a distinguished lawyer of New York, entitled, 'Nothing to Wear' (236). Carleton initially made sketches for the illustrations himself, but later gave them to his friend Augustus Hoppin, who made the drawings into woodcuts. The book was "immensely popular" and Derby notes that despite a financial panic in 1857, the book sold steadily. Derby prints an excerpt from the poem on p.237 which dicusses "Miss Flora McFlimsey, of Madison Square." Shortly after the poem's publication in book form, a Miss Peck of an Episcopal minister in Greenwich, Conn., claimed to be the author of the poem. She claimed to have lost the manuscript while shopping in New York and riding on the Madison Ave. stage, where she argued that Butler must have found it and claimed it as his own. The controversy helped book sales, and to keep things going, Carelton offered Mortimer M. Thomson one dollar a line for a humorous poem on the situation. Thomson wrote eight hundred lines (and was paid eight hundred dollars)- four times the length of Butler's poem - for "Nothing to Say," illustrated by John McLenan. This book also sold very well (237-238).

Clapp, Henry [pages:232,239,412]

Derby writes that at the time of the founding of the Saturday Press Clapp "was a man well-known at the time in journalistic circles." Clapp was editor-in-chief of the paper (232). Derby also writes about how Clapp often took charge of the Saturday Press's advertising receipts as he did not like to sleep in the morning and Aldrich often slept in (232).

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby calls him "that famous King of all Bohemia." Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians" (239).

Clare, Ada [pages:412]

Derby writes that P.B. Shillaber recollected Charles F. Brown (Artemus Ward) dining at Pfaff's with Ada Clare (412).

Curtis, George [pages:35,96,101,104-105,107,109,163,171,314,627,683-685]

Derby recalls that Curtis returned from his "Eastern travels" thirty-five years before his writing, and, that upon his return, he brought a manuscript that discussed his travels to Harper & Brothers for publication. Col. John Harper looked over his manuscript briefly and told Curtis' "We will publish your book, and you may bring us all the manuscripts on Syria you choose, if written as well as this" (683). The books that followed were: "Nile Notes on the Howadji," "Howadji in Syria," and Lotus-Eating," illustrated by John F. Kensett. The last book appears to have been well received by the London press (683-684).

Derby and Curtis met "when he was connected with a publishing house whose disastrous failure soon terminated his career as a book publisher;" the firm accrued great debts, which Curtis was not obligated to pay, "but he considered himself morally responsible for the debts, and did pay every dollar from the proceeds of the earnings of his pen and eloquent lectures which became so popular throughout the whole country" (684).

In 1854, Curtis was a contributor to Putnam's Monthly and was also on the magazine's editorial staff. His contributions were "a series of satirical sketches on fashionable society, which obtained great popularity and were afterwards published in a volume under their title, 'The Potiphar Papers'" (684).

Derby writes that "In 1856, Mr. Curtis entered the political arena, not as an office-seeker or an office-holder, for he has never been either, but a steady friend of all that is pure in politics" (684).

According to Derby, at the time of his writing, "Mr. Curtis has been, for more than a quarter of a century, the editor of Harper's Weekly, which under his guidance has become not only an influential factor in politics, but emphatically what it claims to be -- a journal of civilization" (685). Derby also notes that aside from being an "author, journalist, and statesman" he is also a "lecturer and orator, and in my opinion, the most eloquent and graceful since the voices of Phillips and Sumner have been forever silenced" (685).

Curtis was one of the writers gathered at the complimentary fruit and flower festival held for distinguished authors by New York publishers at the Crystal Palace in 1855 (35).

Derby quotes Curtis in the "Editor's Easy Chair" of Harper's about James Harper's fatal accident (96). Curtis is also quoted discussing Fletcher Harper after his death (101). Derby quotes Curtis's "Easy Chair" column about Fletcher Harper on p.105. He is also quoted discussing the division of labor among the Harper brothers on p.107.

During the early days of the Civil War, Curtis was appointed the political editor of Harper's Weekly, a position he "continues to hold with commanding ability" at the time of Derby's writing (104-105).

Derby quotes some lines written by Curtis that are incsribed over the fireplace of the Harper's private office in Franklin Square, which he feels "express, in the most felicitous manner, the traditional spirit of the [Harper publishing] house:

"My flame expires; but let true hands pass on
An unextinguished torch from sire to son" (109).

Derby describes Curtis as a "graceful orator" in his discussion of the memory of William Cullen Bryant. Part of Curtis's "commemorative address" at the Academy of Music, for the New York Historical Society, December 30, 1883 is quoted on p.171-172.

Derby notes that Curtis's "celebrated" "Potiphar Papers" were first submissions to Putnam's Monthly Magazine (314).

Curtis's recollections of James Fields and his bookstore are reprinted by Derby p.627-629.

Derby reprints the following excerpt from an article contributed to the Century Magazine by S.S. Conant, executive editor of Harper's Weekly:

"His devotion to journalism and political affairs has prevented Mr. Curtis from pursuing authorship as a profession, if we are to regard authorship as the writing of books; but although he has put forth no new volume since the publication of 'Trumps,' the readres of the 'Easy Chair' in Harper's Magazine, and on 'Manners upon the Road,' in Harper's Bazaar, with recognize in him the most charming essayist of the day. The delicate, graceful humor of these papers, the purity of style, the wide range of culture and observation which they indicate, but which is never obtrusive, give them a distinctive character of their own. The 'Easy Chair' is the first part of the magazine to which the reader turns. The author of 'Trumps,' 'The Potiphar Papers,' and 'Prue and I,' could hardly have failed as a novelist, had he chosen to pursue the path of literature; but we will not regret his choice, for while we have many novelists, where shall we look for another name like his in the field of American journalism?" (685).

Elliott, Charles [pages:539,640,643-644]

Elliot's work is included in Frederick S. Cozzens's first published volume of prose and verse sketches (539).

Derby writes that Elliot's "portriat of Fletcher Harper is believed to be as near a perfect representation of the human face as was ever produced by a portrait painter." Derby relates an anedote about Elliot told by Robert S. Chilton that Chilton feels shows "a strong trait of his amiable character -- a disposition to encourage young and struggling members of his profession -- and being highly comic withal, is oneof the funniest, and as I happen to know, founded on fact" p. 643-644 (643).

Emerson, Ralph [pages:89,158,277,280,283,286,289,313,328,339,519,535,582,591,624]

Emerson gave "a characteristic address" at the gathering to celebrate Bryant at the Century Club (158).

Derby also notes that at this time Houghton, Mifflin & Co. were the publishers of Emerson's works, along with other "celebrated writers of prose and poetry" (277).

Emerson included Stedman's "How old Brown took Harper's Ferry" in his "Parnassus" (535).

Goodrich, Frank [pages:113,114,123-126,239,241]

Derby recalls that shortly after the establishment of the New York Daily Times, letters from the Paris correspondent, Dick Tinto, were printed in the paper. "Dick Tinto" was Goodrich's nom-de-plume; Goodrich was the only son of Samuel G. Goodrich (Peter Parley). These letters caught the public's attention and were printed in Harper's (123).

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians." Derby notes that his pen name was "Dick Tinto" (239).

According to Derby, Goodrich was a classmate and life-long friend of Nathaniel Hawthorne (113).

For publisher George W. Carleton, Goodrich translated the entire novels of Balzac. "The work was well done and although Balzac was the most popular novelist in France, and is even now talked of as the greatest French novelist, the books proved a failure." Goodrich was also the author of the "Court of Napoleon" and other popular works. He was one of "Peter Parley's" sons and had been the French correspondent to the Times, writing under the name "Dick Tinto" (241).

Greeley, Horace [pages:72,127-140,143-145,194,203,205,222-224,247,248,250,259,268,270,295,316,317,338,339,352,360,362,423,427,428,482-484,639]

Greeley was editor and publisher of the New Yorker fifty years prior to Derby's writing (approximately 1830s). This paper was discontinued in 1841 (127). Greeley founded the New York Tribune that same year; the paper "soon became the favorite newspaper of the booksellers, and especially the publishers of books" (128). Aside from lecturing and editing the Tribune, Greeley also authored several books (131). Derby cites Greeley's The American Conflict as his "most important and valuable book" (131).

Derby also reprints Stedman's poetic tribute to Greeley p138-140. According to Derby, "The names of William Cullen Bryant, Thurlow Weed, Horace Greeley, and Henry Jarvis Raymond are recorded in the permanent political and literary history of our country." By Derby's estimation, these men were "the four great editors who names and whose fame became national through the journals, of which they were the controlling spirits as well as through authorship, all of them having been writers of books" (352-353). Halpine was one of Greeley's "great favorites" (427).

Greeley ran for President in 1872; Halpine's the "Flaunting Lie" had been popularly misattributed to him and was used against him by Southern politicians (428).

Halleck, Fitz-Greene [pages:35,156,159,229,250,293-295,313,354,538,542,543,582,584,591-593,623,624,629]

Halleck was one of the writers gathered at the complimentary fruit and flower festival held for distinguished authors by New York publishers at the Crystal Palace in 1855 (35).

Aldrich's volume of poetry, the Ballad of Baby Bell, attracted the attention of Frederick S. Cozzens, who arranged for a meeting between Aldrich and Halleck. Halleck had read the poem and written to Cozzens, telling him that he would like to meet the author. "Aldrich said that Halleck was most delightfully kind and complimentary" (299).

Halleck worked as a a clerk for John Jacob Astor and was also one of Mr. Astor's legatees after his death. Halleck was left "the munificent sum of two hundred dollars per year. It is said, however, that such a sum was left to Mr. Halleck in accordance with a remark once made by him in the presence of Mr. Astor that he could live on two hundred dollars per anum" (294-295).

Halleck's biographer is General James Grant Wilson (542). Frederick Cozzens's "last literary effort was a memorial of Fitz Greene Halleck, which was delivered before and printed by the New York Historical Society a short time previous to his death" (543).

According to Derby, Halleck was one of the many "literary celebrities [that] would congregate to discuss the topics of the day" at Daniel Bixby's hotel at the corner of Broadway and Park Place during the 1850s (591). "Fitz Greene Halleck was a constant guest and was very fond of that part of the city. Every day after breakfast, and again after dinner at the hotel, he would go down to Bowling Green, there to meet his old acquaintances. At that time he was one of the trustees of the Astor Library, and always spoke very kindly of its founder, and of his son, William B. Astor, in the warmest terms of the pleasant relations they held towards each other" (592). At this time, Halleck's permanent address was in Guilford, Conn.

Halpine, Charles [pages:239,360,411-412,426-33]

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians" Derby also notes that his pen name was "Miles O'Reilly" (239).

Derby writes that he met Halpine, a "young Irishman," later known as "Miles O'Reilly" in 1854, when he was about twenty-five. The young writer brought him a letter of introduction from B.P. Shillaber of the Boston Post. "The substance of the letter gave me to understand that the bearer was an educated young Irishman who had been employed on the Post and alos on the Carpet Bag, a weekly humorous paper on which both of them had been associated. The letter also stated that the bearer was not only a brilliant writer on any subject, but a born poet and a real genius in wit and humor. After reading the letter I congratulated Charles G. Halpine, for such was his name -- better known a few years later as Miles O'Reilly -- on being in possession of so much literary talent. Young Halpine disclaimed any of the attributes which the letter conveyed; he thought it might be one of Mrs. Partington's last jokes" (426).

Derby published a book of Halpine's verses anonymous, at Halpine's request, "for the purpose, he said, of testing the public pulse as to his poetic talent, if he had any" (427). Halpine let Derby have the verses without copyrightm "if I would risk an edition at my onw expense" (426). "This little volume of poems was the beginning of Halpine's brilliant literary, military and political career" (427).

According to Derby, Halpine had no trouble getting editorial work at the Herald, Tribune, and the Times and was well-paid for his well-written editorials. Halpine was also "connected with several weekly semi-literary papers. His great versatility of talent enabled him to write on almost any subject" (427). Derby writes that Halpine was a "great favorite" of Horace Greeley, Henry J. Raymond, and James Gordon Bennett, the influential editors of the time (427).

During the Civil War, Halpine sided with the Union, "rendering good service with both tongue and pen, thsu illustrating in his own person the apothegm 'the pen is mightier than the sword;' for although he was a brave and efficient Federal officer, one song of his alone was probably more effectual in inducing the Irish element of the country to enlist in the Union army, than all the recruiting officers in the Empire city" (428). According to Derby, rousing the Irish was essential to building troops, as their prejudices prevented or impaired their involvement in the war and army (428). Halpine maintained a correspondence with Northern papers during the war under the pen name "Private Miles O'Reilly," and "was for a long time believed to be a genuine Milesian private soldier" (429). Derby reprints the song that Halpine wrote as Miles O'Reilly "which became very popular among the Irish, and produced a revulsion in the feelings towards the contrabands, who had been armed by the Federal authorities" titled "Sambo's Right To Be Kilt" on p.429-430 (429).

According to Derby, Halpine died unexpectedly in 1869. The following account was printed in the biographical sketch of Halpine that prefaced his poetical works, edited by his friend Robert B. Roosevelt, and published by Harper & Bros., 1869:

"Early in the last week of his life he had written his poem commemorative of the Irish Legion, and on his final Saturday he was at the office of the Citizen until about two o'clock, in gayer humor and more genial mood than usual, alhtough he was invariably a charming companion. Later he was attacked with violent pain in the head and he had recourse to chloroform. The apothecary, by a well-intentioned but unfortunate error, gave him a diluted article which had no effect, and which he detected as deficient in strength. Then he sent for more, and under the delusion that it was also weak or adulterated, while it was actually of full strength, inhaled too much of it and became insensible. Thus, by a mere accident, a most important life waws taken away from this public and at its period of greatest usefulness. He died ere more than half his natural term of activity had run, at the age of thirty-nine, at a period when his faculties were in their most perfect development" (430).

Aside from his poetry, Halpine also publised two humorous books called, "Miles O'Reilly, his book" and "Baked Meats of the Funeral." "Miles O'Reilly" Halpine, as Derby calls him, became so popular "among all classes of voters, that the year prior to his death he was elected to the important and lucrative office of Register of New York, by a majority of over 50,000 over the Tammany nominee" (432).

Colonel Forney, in his book, Anedotes of Public Men, reprints the Lines of Miles O'Reilly on the Downfall of Richmond and writes: "they are among the most beautiful productions in the English language; recalling the handsome features and royal gifts of Colonel Charles G. Halpine, who was endeared to so many during his life and who is still so sincerely mourned" (433).

Charles A. Dana recollected that during a farewell dinner for Henry J. Raymond in the summer of 1867, at the Athenauem Club before Raymond left for Europe, "Mr. Robert B. Roosevelt, so well known in the political and piscatory world, sang on that occasion to the tune of 'Jeannette and Jeannot' an impromptu parting song, written by the late Charles G. Halpine, so well known as 'Miles O'Reilly.' The song opens as follows: --

'To Raymond on His Travels.
(Air: Jeannette and Jeannot.)

'Oh, your boat is at the pier,
And your passage has been paid,
But before you go, my dearest dear
Accept this serande!
For with friendliness we burn,
And rejoicing come the rhymes,
To toast the health and safe return
Of him who rules the Times,--
To toast the heath and safe return of him who rules the Times.'

After Halpine had finished writing the song and the toasts had been drank, Mr. George Jones asked him if he had got it all down. The former quickly replied, 'yes, and more too" (360).

Derby notes that some of Halpine's earliest writings appeared in Shillaber's Carpet Bag. "Mr. Halpine was for a short time associate editor with Mr. Shillaber, where, the latter tells me, he learned to admire and respect his great genius. A more versatile writer, he says, he thinks he never knew, nor one who possessed more power -- often revealed in his strictures upon contemporaries -- which made him enemies; but they were afraid of him and rarely struck back. He was a ripe scholar, and hated the namby-pambyism of the literary press, and the feeble nothings, as he regarded them, of their contributions. He was a remorseless writer, and dashed among people right and left, impaling them upon his pen-point and showing them no mercy. As a poet he was brilliant and senuous; one poem -- 'An imperfect Hymn to the Types' -- was a really sublime effort. He was most fascinating in his manner, holding every one to his will, whether liking him or not, and a true friend where he became attached. He was very classical, had Horace at his finger-ends, and sported an alias for every phase of his writing. Resulting from the bitterness of his witticism, he was actually challenged to a duel, to come off in Canada, by one that he had excoriated" (411-412).

Howells, William [pages:198,232,283]

Howells was one of the "foremost writers of fiction" asked by Charles A. Dana to contribute a novelette that would appear in the Sunday edition of the Sun (198).

Derby calls him "the now popular novelist," and notes that he was made assitant editor of the Atlantic Monthly in 1866, and after succeed James T. Fields as the principal editor of the magazine (232). Derby notes that Howells retired in 1880, succeed by Aldrich (232).

Nast, Thomas [pages:696-697]

Derby quotes James Parton's "Triumphs of Enterprise" for his account of the beginning of Nast's career (696-97). In “Triumphs of Enterprise” James Parton provides details about the beginning of Nast’s career: “Being remarkably short for his age, and of a boyish expression of countenance, the publisher looked at him with astonishment. ’What, my boy,’ said he, ’so you think you can draw well enough for my paper, do you?’ ’I would like to try,’ said the youth” (qtd. in J. Derby 696).

Leslie gave Nast the task of capturing the image of the waterfront as the Hoboken ferry was docking: “This was putting the lad to a severe test. Mr. Leslie . . . had not expectation of the ’little fellow’s’ doing it, and gave him the job merely for the purpose of bringing home to his youthful mind the absurdity of his application. The young artist repaired immediately to the ferry-house, where he at once proceeded to the performance of the difficult task assigned to him. He struck boldly, however, upon the paper, and produced a sketch, which, though far from correct, abounded in those graphic and vigorous touches so needful in popular illustration. Mr. Leslie saw at a glance its merits and defects, and at once made a place for him in his establishment" (qtd. in J. Derby 696-697).

Newell, Robert [pages:239]

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians." Derby notes that his pen name was "Orpheus C. Kerr" (239).

O'Brien, Fitz-James [pages:232,239,354]

He is listed as one of the "associates" of the Saturday Press. Derby notes that he is deceased at the time of his writing (232).

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians" (239).

When the Times doubled its size in 1852, O'Brien was among the "brilliant corps of assistant editors" hired by Raymond (354).

Osgood, James [pages:277,281,438,591,626,669]

"In 1878, the firm of James R. Osgood & Co., who were the successors of the old and well-known house of Ticknor & Fields, was consolidated with Hurd & Houghton, and H.O. Houghton & Co." Osgood left this new firm May 1, 1880, to found a new publishing house that operates under his name (277).

After the original publishers of the Atlantic Monthly ceased to exist, the periodical became the property of Ticknor & Fields, then James R. Osgood & Co., and finally, Hougton, Mifflin, & Co., the magazine's publishers at the time of Derby's writing (281).

At the time of Derby's writing, James R. Osgood & Co., were the publishers of Joel Chandler Harris's works (438).

Pfaff, Charles [pages:239,412]

Derby writes that for "many of the brigtest and most popular humorous men of the day" "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restaurant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohmians" (239).

Derby writes that after working for Shillaber at the Carpet Bag, Charles F. Browne ("Artemus Ward") met his old boss in New York, where Shillaber described him as "transformed into a city buck, associating with Henry Clapp in editing Vanity Fair, and dined at Pfaff's with Ada Clare and the Bohemians" (412).

Poe, Edgar [pages:231,246,252,297,302-303,348,546-548,585,588-590,597,622,662]

When Aldrich began his assistant editorship at The Home Journal, he wrote and worked at the same desk Poe used when he worked at the paper (231).

Poe pronounced Alice Cary's "Pictures of a Memory" "one of the very finest poems produced in America" (246). Derby also writes that "When Edgar Allan Poe published his sketches of the literati of New York City, in 1846, he placed Mrs. Smith [Elizabeth Oakes Smith] in the front rank among the poets of this country." Derby also briefly discusses Poe's review of her poem "The Sinless Child" (546). Derby also includes Mrs. Smith's recollections of Poe, including the following:

"Mr. Poe called on me a great many times, and was always the gentleman. His conversation without being fluent was ready and pointed; he could turn a compliment almost as elegantly as N.P. Willis. Oftentimes, Poe would converse with me upon literature, metaphysics, poetry, and everything in that direction, but he never talked about his immediate surroundings. When he was talking and interested he had that far-away look which was so usual with him" (547).

Of the publication of the Raven, Derby also quotes Mrs. Smith:

"The Raven was first published in the New York Review. I had not seen it, when one evening Charles Fenno Hoffman called with the Review, and read it to me. He was a fine reader, and read the poem with great feeling. His reading affected me so much I arose and walked the floor, and said to him, 'It is Edgar Poe himself.' He had not told me who the author was; indeed, it was published anonymously. 'Well,' said I, 'every production of genius has an internal life as well as its external. Now, how do you interpret this, Mr. Hoffman?' The latter, who had many disappointments and griefs in life, replied, 'It is despair brooding over wisdom.'

The next morning who should call but Mr. Poe. I told him what Mr. Hoffman had said. Poe folded his arms and looked down, saying, 'That is a recognition.' Soon the Raven became known everwhere and everyone was saying 'Nevermore.'

One afternoon Poe called on me and said, 'I find my Rave is really being talked about a great deal. I was at the theatre last night, and the actor interpolated the word "Nevermore," and it did add force to the sentiment that was given, and the audience immediately (he looked so pleased when he said this), evidently took the allusion.'

One day he said to me, as he rolled up some of his MS., 'Sometimes I think that all my success is due to my good penmanship, my writing with such care, finishing my paragraphs, and the care I take of my manuscript,' which was really equal to copper-plate" (547-548).

Derby mentions that a young Stoddard was given his story "Ulalume" to read and critique by Mrs. Kirkland, editor of the Union Magazine. Stoddard told Mrs. Kirkland that he did not understand the story, and she decided to return the story to its author (597).

Raymond, Henry [pages:72,352-363,364,366,392,427,492]

According to Derby, "The names of William Cullen Bryant, Thurlow Weed, Horace Greeley, and Henry Jarvis Raymond are recorded in the permanent political and literary history of our country." By Derby's estimation, these men were "the four great editors who names and whose fame became national through the journals, of which they were the controlling spirits as well as through authorship, all of them having been writers of books" (352-353).

Raymond began his newspaper career as an assitant editor to Horace Greeley at the Tribune. Ten years after the publication of the first issue of the Tribune The New York Daily Times appeared (September 18, 1851), "a new daily paper representing the views so clearly set forth in the prospectus issued by Raymond, Jones & Co." It was a morning and evening paper that sold for one cent; "it quickly became a favorite among the better class of readers and was successful from the start." Derby notes that shares of the paper have increased in value and continue to do so (353). The Times doubled its size in 1852, due to its success, hiring a "brilliant corps of assistant editors," including Charles F. Briggs, William Henry Hurlburt, Fitz James O'Brien, E.L. Godkin, R.J. De Cordova, and Edward Seymour (354).

Raymond was elected Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1853, and declined the nomination for Governor in 1854 to return to the Times as editor-in-chief. Raymond was also very active in the Republican party and the elections of 1856 and 1860 (354-355). Raymond was elected a member of Congress for the City of New York in 1861, "where his great ability as a debater and leader was very soon recognized" (357). Raymond decided "to devote himself entirely to journalism, which was more to his taste" after his Congressional term expired (359).

In 1864, Raymond began discussing plans for a book that dealt with the life and Presidential administration of Abraham Lincoln. The book was written and published in the ninety days following the President's assisination. About 65,000 copies sold in the first six months (357-358).

Raymond also gave a speech at a farewell dinner at Delmonico's for Charles Dickens on April 18, 1865 (359). A farewell dinner was given for Raymond in the summer of 1867 at the Athanaeum Club before his own trip to Europe. It was on this evening that Halpine's "To Raymond on His Travels" was sung to the group by Mr. Robert B. Roosevelt (359-360). According to Derby, Halpine was a "great favorite" of the prominent newspaper editors of the time, including Raymond (427).

Before Raymond could depart, however, he died on June 18, 1867, at his home of apoplexy. According to Derby, "The next morning, June 19, the Times appeared in full mourning. Suddenly it had lost its founder. His unexpected death caused, as well it might, a profound sensation. The public were not prepared for such a startling event which was dwelt upon by the press throughout the United States, as a national loss to journalism" (361-362). After Raymond's death, George Jones carried out his wishes for the Times, including voluntary raises for several "faithful co-workers of the Times should be made for the excellent work they were doing, that they might thus share in the general prosperity of the paper" (364).

The Saturday Press [pages:232]

Derby writes "Thore (sic) were about twenty young literary people connected with the Saturday Press. There was no cash book or other account books kept, thus avoiding the expense of a book-keeper. Whatever money was received went into the hands of whichever proprietor happened to be in the office at the time. Mr. Aldrich once told me that Mr. Clapp could not sleep in the morning, while he, being young and in excellent health, slept until about nine o'clock. Through this habit he got little or nothing of the money which came in for advertisements, as Mr. Clapp, being the first on hand, confiscated the receipts" (232).

Savage, John [pages:250,255,724]

Derby writes that Savage "is well-known in the literary world as a poet, dramatist and biographer." Derby lists his books to date as follows: "Songs of Fatherland" (Redfield, 1850), "History and Literature of Ireland" (Redfield, 1856), "Our Living Representative Men" (George Childs), "Life of Andrew Johnson" (Derby & Miller, 1865) (724).

Savage is also listed among the "distinguished people of literary tastes" whom he met at the Cary sisters' home in the 1850s (250).

Shaw, Henry [pages:239,242-243]

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians." Derby notes that his real name was Henry W. Shaw (239).

Derby writes: "Almost every newspaper in the country, publishes frequently some of the quaint sayings of 'Josh Billings,' whose real name is Henry W. Sha; the latter says, speaking of his success as an author, that he failed to succeed until he commenced to spell his words incorrectly; then his wise and sententious sayings became immensely popular. His jokes are always to the point, although told in a humorous vein." Derby notes that Carleton published "The Life and Adventures of Josh Billings" "appropriately illustrated, including many of his quaint sayings." Derby calls "Josh Billings' Farmer's Alminax" a "curious commercial success" in which "he intended to burlesque the odl fashioned Farmer's Almanac in vogue half a century ago." Over one hundred and thirty thousand copies of the book sold in its first year. According to Derby, at the time of his writing, over half a million copies have sold, netting a profit of over thirty thousand dollars for Carleton and Billings (242-243).

Stedman, Edmund [pages:138,169,241-242,250,526,529,530-37,603]

Derby first met Stedman forty years prior to the writing of his book, when Stedman was seven years old. This meeting occured while Stedman and his widowed mother were on vacation; she was a poet, and became "well and favorably known in literary circles" (530). Derby notes that twenty years later, in 1860, "young Stedman had begun to make his mark in literature, and now, a quarter of a century later still, he stands as is well-known in the front rank of American men of letters" (530). Accoriding to Derby, Stedman comes from a long line of poets and men of letters. He attended Yale College in 1849, and was a member of "the famous class of 1853" (530). Stedman is also listed among the "distinguished people of literary tastes" whom he met at the Cary sisters' home in the 1850s (250). He dedicated his 1884 "collective edition" of his poetry to his mother, Elizabeth Clementine Kinney: "This Collection is Affectionately and Reverently Dedicated to my Myother, In Gratitude for Whatsoever I Inherit of Her Own Sweet Gift of Song" (529).

Stedman began newspaper work in 1852, in Norwich, Conn. After this, he edited the Herald in Winsted, Conn. He moved to New York in 1855, where he became a member of the Tribune staff in 1859, and later joined the editorial staff of the New York World. He became the paper's war correspondent from 1861 to 1863; "His description in that paper of the battle of Bull Run, was considered, at the time, the most graphic account given of that disastrous route of the Union army" (531).

Derby writes that Stedman's most recent publication venues have been Vanity Fair, Putnam's, Harper's, Scribner's, and the Atlantic Monthlies. Stedman also contributed poems or "interesting literary essays" to the New York Independent and North American Review (531).

Derby writes that Stedman's goal when arriving in New York was to support himself by living a literary life. His family scraped by with his income from journalistic work, however, until 1859, "when he awoke one morning to find himself famous as the author of the 'Diamond Wedding,' a poem which he contributed to the New York Tribune (531-532). According to Derby, this poem was written without the thought of publication, but when it was published in the Tribune, it was well-liked a reprinted in several of the city's papers and in several editions of the Tribune. "The poet looked on it as a good joke at the time, as he considered it an inferior order of poetry, nothing more than a bright piece of society verse. It was copied throughout American and Europe, and republished in book-form by G.W. Carelton & Co." (532). Derby claims that part of the poem's popularity circles around "the extraordinary marriage of the rich Cuban Oviedo to the beautiful Miss Bartlett." The bride's father, a Lieutennant Bartlett of the Navy, "became very angry about the poem, because of all the sensation it caused in the fashionable world." Bartlett challenged Stedman to a duel, which Stedman accepted. Bartlett backed out, however, "saying that he had come to the conclusin that Stedman's family was not equal to his in the social world" (532). Derby reprints extracts from the "Diamond Wedding on p. 532-533 to illustrate the cause of the controversy and interest in the poem. Later, Derby writes, Stedman met with the widowed Mrs. Oviedo, who was a fan of his work and "had made up her mind that he would learn some time that she was not so foolish a woman she had been when a girl" (534). A friendship formed between the poet, his wife, and the widow (also a published poet) (534).

Derby also writes that during the Civil War, there was one point during which Stedman was "in confidential relations with the government" (534).

Derby lists Stedman's "hits" as the "Ballad of Lager Bier," "How old Brown took Harper's Ferry" (both published in a book by Scribner titled "The Tribune Lyrics) (535). The second poem was written and published during the trial of Brown, and attracted a lot of attention (535). According the Derby, this poem also prompted the poet's friendship with Bayard Taylor, who would sometimes read it to audiences during his lectures. The two men met when Taylor returned to New York; Stedman asked Taylor about Stoddard, and Taylor introduced them, beginning their life-long friendships (535). Derby writes that both Stedman and Stoddard wrote prose and poetic tributes to Taylor after his death (535).

At the time of his fame for his ballad "How old Brown took Harper's Ferry," Stedman was appointed to the reporting staff of the New York Tribune under Charles A. Dana (535). His first assignment was "the interesting account of the death of Washington Irving"; this was the only time Stedman ever saw Irving (536).

Stedman gave up journalism a few years later and attempted to devote himself to literature. At that time, this line of work did not pay. "He had saved a thousand dollars with which to begin operations in Wall Street, where he operated and became a popular and successful banker. Out of the one thousand dollars invested he soon made from ten to twelve thousand dollars. Mr. Stedman has often been criticised for being in Wall Street. He has been there solely for the purpose of having Sundays and evenings and summer vacations for poetry and critical literary work, which time he has studiously utilized" (536). According to Derby, Mr. Stedman has kept his Wall Street operations small, earning an income sufficient to make his literary pursuits possible. Derby notes that Stedman makes a "handsome" salary from the copyrights of his poetry, which is quite popular. Derby also writes that "His 'Victorian Poets' shows him to be a master critic as well as a born poet." Stedman is also asked on a regular basis to contribute poems to magazines and newspapers, for which he can name his own price. Derby also writes of Stedman's forthcoming poetry to be published by Harper & Brothers around Christmas (536). According to Derby, the $50 a piece that Stedman charged for the two poems he provided was lower than the editor expected (537). Derby also speaks of Stedman's forthcoming "Poetry in America," "a companion volume to his 'Victorian Poets,' which has been received with such great favor by the most eminent critics of this country and Europe" (537).

Derby also writes that Stedman and Ellen Mackay Hutchinson are compiling and editing "another most important literary exercise" in the form of "a library of American literature from the earliest settlement to the present time." According to Derby, this "library" is comiled "in ten elegant large octavo volumes of over five hundred pages each, illustrated with portraits of distinguished authors. A work of this kind is urgently called for by the literary intelligence of the country, and in the competant hands of its accomplished editors, a work of great value may be expected" (537).

Derby reprints Stedman's poetic tribute to Greeley p.138-140. Stedman, Taylor, and Stoddard were among the poets who wrote and read original poems at the funeral of William Cullen Bryant (169).

Stoddard, Elizabeth [pages:250,603]

Derby notes that Stoddard's wife is the "author of three clever novels": "The Morgensons" (published by Carleton, 1862), "Two Men" (1865), and "Temple House" (1867). "She has also contributed sketches in prose and poetry to the principal magazines in the country. A lady of cultivated tastes, she is a very efficient aid to her husband in his literary pursuits" (603).

Derby concludes his discussion of Stoddard noting "The pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard is filled with many mementoes of their literary and artistic tastes, gathered together with much care, during their eventful literary career" (603).

Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard are also listed by Derby among the "distinguished people of
literary tastes" whom he met at the home of the Cary sisters in the 1850s (250).

Stoddard, Richard [pages:35,158,162-163,169,239,250,255,280,535,595-603,699]

Stoddard was one of the writers gathered at the complimentary fruit and flower festival held for distinguished authors by New York publishers at the Crystal Palace in 1855 (35). Stoddard was also one of several poets to give a "poetical tribute" to William Cullen Bryant at a dinner held for him at the Century Club (158). Derby also reprints a section of Stoddards's article on the death of Bryant from the New York Evening Post p.162-163. Stedman, Taylor, and Stoddard were among the poets who wrote and read original poems at the funeral of William Cullen Bryant (169).

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians" (239). Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard are also listed by Derby among the "distinguished people of
literary tastes" whom he met at the home of the Cary sisters in the 1850s (250).
Derby writes that Stoddard was introduced to Stedman through Bayard Taylor. Stedman and Taylor had recently met, and Stedman asked Taylor about Stoddard, "the poet, whom he had always wanted to know." Taylor introduced the two men the next day and began a life-long friendship between the two men. Derby also writes of Stedman and Stoddard's prose and poetic tributes to Taylor after his death (535).

After the publication of Stoddard's first volume of poems (approximately thrity years prior to Derby's writing), Mary Russell Mitford commented in a letter to James T. Fields, "Mr. Stoddard is one of the poets of whom America may well be proud" (595). Derby follows this statement with his own: "America is proud of Mr. Stoddard's poetical talents, and no critic of authority will deny that that writer possesses the true poetic gift of imaginative composition" (595).

Stoddard's first publication appeared in 1843, when Stoddard was about nineteen years old, in the literary paper the Rover, edited by the poet Seba Smith (595). Shortly after this, Stoddard brought N.P. Willis some of his manuscript poems and asked him to review and critique his work. Willis wrote the following note that Stoddard received when he called at the offices of the Home Journal a few weeks later: "I should think the writer of these poems had genius enough to make a reputation. Pruning, trimming and condensing is necessary to make them what they should be; the same labor was necessary to make Lord Byron's genius, and that of Tom Moore. It is hard work to do, but well paid when done" (596). Derby writes, "These words were the first real encouragement that he had ever received, an Mr. Stoddard further says, that no young person possessing any kind of talent ever appealed to N.P. Willis without receving aid and encouragement" (596).

Stoddard's second published poem was published in Union Magazine bu Mrs. C.M. Kirkland, who appears to have been quite supportive and influential in Stoddard's early career. On one occasion, she showed him the manuscript of Poe's "Ulalume" and asked him to read and give his opinion of the work. Stoddard admitted that he could not understand the story, and Mrs. Kirkland told him that it had been submitted for publication in the Union Magazine, but would be returned to Poe (596-597).

Stoddard met Bayard Taylor through Mrs. C.M. Kirkland. When she left for Europe, she left Taylor in charge of the Union Magazine, and "told Mr. Stoddard, that during her absence, he had better call upon the latter, as he would be sure to like him" (597). Derby reprints Stoddard's account of their first meeting from recollections of Bayard Taylor, contributed to the New York Independent p.597-599.

On the recommendation of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Stoddard obtained a position of at the New York Custom House in 1853,and held his position for seventeen years, during which he also wrote continually for magazines and newspapers (600). Derby also mentions Stoddard's Life of Baron Humboldt, published on by Carleton on the condition that the introduction be written by Taylor, a friend of Humboldt's. The book was quite successful, but Derby notes that this might have been due to the book being marketed as Taylor's Life of Humboldt (600).

Derby also notes that "Mr. Stoddard has been on familiar terms with most of the literary people of the day" and discusses Stoddard's friendships and opinions of other poets (601).

Derby reprints what he believes to be William Cullen Bryant's last letter, written to Stoddard, p. 602-603.

Derby notes that at the time of his writing, Stoddard has lived in New York for nearly fifty years. At this time, he is "connected with the editorial department of the New York Evening Mail, to which position he is eminently fitted, by his long experience as a literary critic. As a poet, Mr. Stoddard ranks in public estimation with his friends Edmund C. Stedman and Thomas Bailey Aldrich, contributing more frequently, however, to magazines and other literary journals of the day" (603).

Derby concludes his discussion of Stoddard noting "The pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard is filled with many mementoes of their literary and artistic tastes, gathered together with much care, during their eventful literary career" (603).

Swinton, William [pages:54-55]

Derby mentions that Swinton's "series of School Readers" are published by Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & Co., a popular eductional publisher of the time. Derby writes that Swinton's educational books have done very well; "the sales of which have reached a magnitude that would astonish my readers, were I permitted to give them" (54-55).

Derby also writes, "Mr. Swinton is the author of several interesting volumes on the late Civil War, which have been received with marked favor in military circles. He was military editor and army correspondent of the N.Y. Times, and was present at many of the battles which he vividly describes" (55).

Taylor, Bayard [pages:35,137-138,158,169,184,279-280,301-302,316,535,591,595,596,597,600,601-602]

Taylor was one of the writers gathered at the complimentary fruit and flower festival held for distinguished authors by New York publishers at the Crystal Palace in 1855 (35). Derby reprints a section of Taylor's "interesting reminiscences" about Horace Greeley originally published in a memorial volume by the Tribune Association p.137-138. Taylor also delivered one of several "poetical tributes" to Bryant at a dinner held in his honor at the Century Club (158). Stedman, Taylor, and Stoddard were among the poets who wrote and read original poems at the funeral of William Cullen Bryant (169).

Taylor edited Picturesque Europe for D. Appleton & Co., and also contributed "some of the descriptive letterpress." This book, and others in the "Picturesque" series sold by subscription only (184).

Derby writes of the first meeting between Bayard Taylor and the publisher George Palmer Putnam:

"In the year 1847 Mr. Putnam received a call at his office in Waterloo Place from a young American printer, who had been making a journey through the continent, and whose funds were exhausted. Some remittances he had expected had not come to hand, and he was entirely destitute of the means of support, endeavoring to secure work at his trade in a London printing office, where he succeeded temporarily, but was thrown out of the first position he secured through the jealousy of English compositors, who were not willing to have in the office a foreigner not belonging to their typographical guild. Mr. Putnam sympathizing with the young American, gave him temporary clerical work. This timely assistance laid the foundation for a friendship, a very close one, which lasted as long as their lives.

"Within a year after the acquaintance was formed, Mr. Putnam had the pleasure of publishing the narrative of this young printer's trip over the continent under the title of 'Views Afoot, or Europe seen with a Knapsack and Staff,' by Bayard Taylor. On its publication, the English reviews gave it unstinted praise" (301-302).

At the time of the publication of "Views Afoot," Taylor was twenty-one years old; Derby notes that this book has been in demand for over forty years and has sold more than one hundred thousand copies (302).

According to Derby, Stedman's "How old Brown took Harper's Ferry" was the "indirect cause of the beginning of a lasting friendship with Bayard Taylor." Taylor was lecturing in the West when the poem was published in the Tribune, and would sometimes read the poem to his audiences. When he returned to New York, he and Stedman met for the first time. Stedman asked Taylor about Stoddard, and Taylor introduced the two men the next day, beginning another life-long friendship. Derby also writes that "The death of Bayard Taylor was a great blow to his brother poets, and both Mr. Stedman and Mr. Stoddard have in prose and poetry rendered affectionate tributes to the memory of their friend, the distinguished poet, traveler, and diplomat, whose death created a vacancy in American literature which has never been filled" (535).

According to Derby, "When Bayard Taylor, who was always a favorite with Mr. Willis, returned from Europe, the first time, he took the letters which he had written to a Philadelphia paper, to Wiley & Putnam, to publish in book form, and that firm agreed to do so, provided Mr. Willis would write an introduction for the same, and this secured the publication of 'Views Afoot'" (596).

Stoddard met Bayard Taylor through Mrs. C.M. Kirkland. When she left for Europe, she left Taylor in charge of the Union Magazine, and "told Mr. Stoddard, that during her absence, he had better call upon the latter, as he would be sure to like him" (597). Derby reprints Stoddard's account of their first meeting from recollections of Bayard Taylor, contributed to the New York Independent p.597-599.

Derby also mentions Stoddard's Life of Baron Humboldt, published by Carleton on the condition that the introduction be written by Taylor, a friend of Humboldt's. The book was quite successful, but Derby notes that this might have been due to the book being marketed as Taylor's Life of Humboldt (600).

Derby writes that Stoddard enjoyed a parody of Taylor's "Manuela" called "Martha Hopkins" by Phoebe Cary. "The merit of her parody was not merely that she paraphrased the text of the author comically, but that for every serious situation in his poem she found a corresponding comical one. Mr. Taylor was very much complimented by this parody, as he should have been" (601-602).

Derby notes at the time of his writing "Mrs. Taylor has just completed the biography of her eminent and lamented husband, whose labor of love, in book form, is looked forward to with lively interest by thousands of her late husband's friends" (280).

Thomson, Mortimer [pages:203-204,237-238,239]

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians." Derby notes that his pen name was "Doesticks" (239).

Derby writes that one of George W. Carleton's early publications as a publisher was "that celebrated society poem, by William Allen Butler, then and now a distinguished lawyer of New York, entitled, 'Nothing to Wear' (236). Carleton initially made sketches for the illustrations himself, but later gave them to his friend Augustus Hoppin, who made the drawings into woodcuts. The book was "immensely popular" and Derby notes that despite a financial panic in 1857, the book sold steadily. Derby prints an excerpt from the poem on p.237 which dicusses "Miss Flora McFlimsey, of Madison Square." Shortly after the poem's publication in book form, a Miss Peck of an Episcopal minister in Greenwich, Conn., claimed to be the author of the poem. She claimed to have lost the manuscript while shopping in New York and riding on the Madison Ave. stage, where she argued that Butler must have found it and claimed it as his own. The controversy helped book sales, and to keep things going, Carelton offered Mortimer M. Thomson one dollar a line for a humorous poem on the situation. Thomson wrote eight hundred lines (and was paid eight hundred dollars)- four times the length of Butler's poem - for "Nothing to Say," illustrated by John McLenan. This book also sold very well (237-238).

Thomson was married to Fanny Fern's daughter Grace, who contributed to the New York Ledger, like her mother did. In contributing to the paper, her daughter continued the family tradition (203-204).

Ward, Artemus [pages:232,239,242,411,412,492]

He is listed as one of the "associates" of the Saturday Press. Derby notes that he is deceased at the time of his writing (232).

He is mentioned as one of the "brightest and most popular humorous men of the day," known to rally around the book store of George W. Carleton. Derby notes that "the noonday hour frequently found most of them at Pfaff's celebrated German restuarant, in a Broadway basement, near Bleecker-street, the rendezvous at that day of the so-called Bohemians." Derby notes that his real name is Charles F. Brown (sic) (239).

Derby writes that "Artemus Ward -- His Book" was a great success for publisher George W. Carleton; more than forty thousand copies of the book sold in its first six months (242).

Derby also includes the following about Brown/Ward: "My readers will remember the humorous lectures of Mr. Charles Brown ('Artemus Ward'), which became so popular throughout the country, and soon place him at the front of the humorists of the day. A little incident is told of him, during the days of his great popularity. He was puffing away at a cigar in Mr. Carleton's private office, when a telegram was handed to him from San Francisco, wired by Maguire, the manager of the Opera House of that city, who inquired, 'What will you take for two nights in California?' Brown immediately replied by the same messenger, without altering his position on the sofa, 'Brandy and water. -- A. Ward.' But he did take something else after all, in the shape of a large sum of money from his California audiences, where he lectured with pronounced success. The funny dispatch having been previously printed in the California papers, made everybody laugh, and all wanted to hear him. When Artemus Ward was in Utah lecturing, some one spoke to him about giving a pass to Brigham Young. He immediately wrote a pass, admitting, 'Brigham Young and One Wife'" (242).

Derby notes that the earliest writings of Browne/Ward appear in the weekly paper, the Carpet Bag, started in 1850 by B.P. Shillaber (411).

Derby writes about Shillaber's early recollections of Browne: "Mr. Shillaber says that Charles F. Browne came to the Carpet Bag office from Maine, a shrewd, verdant, good-natured printer, not out of his time. He gave no early evidence of hidden genius, and rarely let himself out beyond joking with his printer associates, and an occiasional short article, modestly submitted, over the signature of 'Lieut. Chub.' These attracted attention, especially one, a reprint, where the Battle of Yorktown was described as the programme of a country muster, and General Washington, under the influence of liquor, got kicked. It was intensely funny. Browne showed that under a rough covering there was a big promise. He soon left for New York, where Mr. Shillaber next met him, a year or two afterwards, transformed into a city buck, associating with Henry Clapp, editing Vanity Fair, and dined at Pfaff's with Ada Clare and the Bohemians. He soon after went off on his lecturing tour, taking the world captive under the nom de plume of 'Artemus Ward' (412).

Derby writes that "Henry J. Raymond once related a curious anecdote about the Proclamation of Emancipation. He said that Secretary Chase told him that the President came into the meeting of the Cabinet after the battle of Antietam, and said he had come across something very amusing in one of Artemus Ward's letters, and he read it through for the edification of the Secretaries. He then said he had brought another document to read to them -- not for their advice and criticism, for his mind was fully made up on the subject, but for their information." According to Raymond, the document was the Proclamiation of Emancipation (492).

Webb, Charles [pages:242]

Derby writes that one of the "anecdotes that Mr. [George W. Carleton] relates about his comic authors, is, that Charles H. Webb ('John Paul') characteristically added on the title-page of one of his burlesques, 'Author of John Paul Sketches, and other books too humorous to mention'" (242).

Wilkins, Edward (Ned) [pages:232]

He is listed as one of the "associates" of the Saturday Press. Derby notes that he is deceased at the time of his writing (232).

Willis, Nathaniel [pages:35,156,219,221,230-231,370,442,547,591,596,622,629]

Willis was one of the writers gathered at the complimentary fruit and flower festival held for distinguished authors by New York publishers at the Crystal Palace in 1855 (35).

Chevalier Wikoff described the young N.P. Willis as "having at that time [when both men were at Yale College] 'a reputation of rare poetical talent, although his tone and bearing were aristocratic not unmixed with hauteur'" (370).

According to Derby, Willis and Morris, when they ran the Home Journal, quoted Halleck's "Winds of March" "with every advent of March" (156).

Some poems Aldrich submitted to The Home Journal caught the attention of N. P. Willis, the editor, who "introduced [the poems] to its readers in a very flattering manner. A habit Mr. Willis always indulged in, when young writers sent in contributions in prose or poetry, that he really liked" (230). After this, Willis suggested to his partner Gen. Geo. P. Morris that he go see Aldrich and hire him as an assitant editor (230).

According to Derby, Willis usually came to the city only twice a month during this period, spending most of his time at his home at Idle-Wild. Aldrich was working at The Home Journal six months before he met Willis (230-231). Derby writes of their first meeting: "One day as he sat in the editorial sanctum, stretched out on three chairs, each foot on a chair, placidly smoking a cigar and lazily looking over the exchanges, he was startled by the sudden appearance of a tall, pleasant looking gentleman, who said, 'Is this Mr. Aldrich? My name is Willis.' The young autocrat of an editor was very much embarassed for the moment, but the famous poet, who was a man of the world, took the situation in at once, and soon put him entirely at ease. In less than five minutes, the young editor felt as if he had known the editor-in-chief all his life" (231).

Willis's sister was Fanny Fern. She married a previous occupant of Aldrich's desk and assistant editor of The Home Journal, James Parton (231).

Shortly after his first publication in the Rover, Stoddard brought N.P. Willis some of his manuscript poems and asked him to review and critique his work. Willis wrote the following note that Stoddard received when he called at the offices of the Home Journal a few weeks later: "I should think the writer of these poems had genius enough to make a reputation. Pruning, trimming and condensing is necessary to make them what they should be; the same labor was necessary to make Lord Byron's genius, and that of Tom Moore. It is hard work to do, but well paid when done" (596). Derby writes, "These words were the first real encouragement that he had ever received, and Mr. Stoddard further says, that no young person possessing any kind of talent ever appealed to N.P. Willis without receving aid and encouragement" (596).

According to Derby, "When Bayard Taylor, who was always a favorite with Mr. Willis, returned from Europe, the first time, he took the letters he which he had written to a Philadelphia paper to Wiley & Putnam to publish in book form, and that firm agreed to do so, provided Mr. Willis would write an introduction for the same, and this secured the publication of 'Views Afoot'" (596).

At the height of his popularity, Willis's publishers were Baker & Scribner; Mr. Armstrong, who worked for the firm was a recent member of the Home Journal. It is through Armstrong that Derby has an account of the arrangement "A new uniform edition" Willis's prose writings that occured forty years prior to Derby's writings. The works published by this house "with the attractive and taking titles" were: "People I Have Met," "Life Here and There," "Famous Places and Persons," "Letters from Under a Bridge," Out-doors at Idlewild," and others (442).

Elizabeth Oakes Smith remarked that Poe "could turn a compliment almost as elegantly as N.P. Willis" (547).

Winter, William [pages:232]

He is listed as one of the "associates" of the Saturday Press. Derby notes that at the time of his writing, Winter is the only "associate" he lists who is not deceased. Winter is, "at the present time the brilliant editor of the dramatic department of the New York Tribune" (232).