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Relationships of Clapp, Henry

To explore the relationships between the various bohemian writers and artists who frequented Pfaff's bar, select a person or group, and then select a relationship type. This section of the site is currently under construction; new content is being added on a regular basis.

Displaying 1 - 139 of 139
acquaintances

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey (1836-1907)

He is mentioned as part of "a group of journalists and magazine-writers" with whom Aldrich was familiar during his days in the "Literary Bohemia" in New York.

Beach, Juliette H. (1829-1900)

Clapp encourages Whitman to send a copy of the 1860 Leaves of Grass to Beach for her consideration.

Emerson, Ralph Waldo (1803-1882)

Emerson is mentioned in a poem of Figaro's (Henry Clapp Jr.) published in the Times.

Halpine, Charles Graham (1829-1868)

Clapp wrote for The New York Leader, then edited by John Clancy and Charles G. Halpine (Miles O'Reilly).

Heron, Matilda (1830-1877)

Howells, William Dean (1837-1920)

Howells states that he "could not disown" his fascination with Clapp during his first meeting with him, even though Clapp's language caused him "inner disgust."

"When, in August, 1860, Howells paid a personal visit to New York and Clapp's editorial office, he found himself displeased with the foreign character of Henry's coterie which he called 'a sickly colony, transplanted from the mother asphalt of Paris, and never really striking root in the pavements of New York.'"

Mackenzie, Robert Shelton (1809-1880)

Stoddard, Richard Henry (1825-1903)

Winter mentions that Clapp had made the acquaintance of Stoddard and that Stoddard sometimes contributed to Saturday Press.

Ward, Artemus (1834-1867)

"Charles F. Browne ('Artemus Ward') read a telegram from a California lecture bureau: 'What will you take for forty nights?' Clapp sang out: 'Brandy and soda, tell them,' an answer that endeared Browne to the West Coast."

Whitman, Walt (1819-1892)

Winter, William (1836-1917)

The author describes Winter as one of Henry Clapp's associates at Pfaff's when it was "a famous resort back in the fifties."

Winter is credited with contributing towards a granite monument for Clapp's grave site and with writing the inscription and epitaph for the monument itself.

Upon Henry Clapp's death, Winter wrote a touching epitaph. However, since the lines were not approved by his only living relative, they were not ascribed on his gravestone.

Winter said that in temperament and mentality Clapp was really more of a Frenchman than an American; he even compared him to Voltaire, in looks, at least.

de Walden, Thomas Blades (1811-1873)

De Walden's controversial playThe Balloon Wedding is recommended by Henry Clapp as an example of necessary "low comedy."

antagonists

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey (1836-1907)

Taylor, Stoddard, Aldrich, and Stedman are mentioned as the parties in New York involved in the "inconsistent opposition" to the third edition of Leaves of Grass in 1859-1860. Clapp battled against them.

Arnold, George (1834-1865)

During Arnold and Whitman's legendary fight at Pfaff's, Clapp broke his pipe pulling on Arnold's coat tail.

Howells, William Dean (1837-1920)

Howells criticized Clapp for his overwhelming support of Walt Whitman.

During Howell's visit to the offices of the Saturday Press on August, 1860, Parry mentions that "he found himself displeased with the foreign character of Henry's coterie."

O'Brien, Fitz-James (1828-1862)

Gunn describes a quarrel between Clapp and O'Brien, "Talk, incidentally of O'Brien, who it seems, has quarreled with Clapp or something like it. O'B sent a lawyer's letter apropos of money owing to him for his "feulleton"izing in the Saturday Press, which Clapp related as an excellent joke. Then he passed into general comment on O'B. "He was too d____d infernal selfish altogether – there was no denying he was a smart man though, and he could stand anything but a fool – give him a rogue, a smart rogue, rather. He don't believe in the good, amiable, Christ like men" (how the ugly countenance grew uglier with spite and unbelief as he said the words) "like Greeley." (113-114).

Stedman, Edmund Clarence (1833-1908)

Taylor, Stoddard, Aldrich, and Stedman are mentioned as the parties in New York involved in the "inconsistent opposition" to the third edition of Leaves of Grass in 1859-1860. Clapp battled against them.

Stoddard, Richard Henry (1825-1903)

Taylor, Stoddard, Aldrich, and Stedman are mentioned as the parties in New York involved in the "inconsistent opposition" to the third edition of Leaves of Grass in 1859-1860. Clapp battled against them.

Taylor, Bayard (1825-1878)

Taylor, Stoddard, Aldrich, and Stedman are mentioned as the parties in New York involved in the "inconsistent opposition" to the third edition of Leaves of Grass in 1859-1860. Clapp battled against them.

collaborators

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey (1836-1907)

Henry Clapp included Aldrich's poetry in his columns of original poems, which usually appeared on the first page of the Saturday Press.

During Aldrich's association with the Press, he frequently missed receiving the advertising revenues because of his habit of sleeping later than Clapp.

Andrews, Stephen Pearl (1812-1886)

Arnold, George (1834-1865)

Arnold is mentioned as one of Henry Clapp's associates at Pfaff's.

Arnold is referred to as a member of Clapp's "cabinet" in the "Kingdom of Bohemia" and at the Saturday Press.

Beach, Juliette H. (1829-1900)

Beach was one of the several people to whom Henry Clapp sent a review copy of Leaves of Grass, thinking that Mrs. Beach "would do Whitman 'great justice in the Saturday Press.'"

Clapp was responsible for sending a review copy of Leaves of Grass to Juliette Beach that was intercepted by her husband.

To help publicize "Leaves of Grass" Clapp "cheerfully" published Beach's "revolted review" of the third edition.

Booth, Edwin (1833-1893)

Clapp reviews Booth's portrayal of Hamlet badly.

Brisbane, Albert (1809-1890)

Clapp worked closely with both Brisbane and Greeley to "popularize the doctrines of Fourier and socialism" before editing the Saturday Press.

Clapp helped Brisbane "introduce Fourier's social theories in America. It was on the ground of a definite admiration of Fourier's ideas that Clapp met Albert Brisbane. He translated Fourier's works for Brisbane, spending long evenings reading them to him."

Clapp was interested in Socialism and translated Fourier's works for Brisbane.

Winter mentions that Clapp was Brisbane's secretary during the time when Fourier's "The Social Destiny of Man" was being translated.

Brougham, John (1810-1880)

Burroughs, John (1837-1921)

Burroughs worked with Clapp at the Saturday Press. Clapp also introduced Burroughs to Whitman, as he knew both men through the Saturday Press, which is also how Burroughs took notice of Whitman's work.

Clare, Ada (1836-1874)

Clapp worked with Ada Clare at the Leader after the Saturday Press dissolved.

Ada Clare worked for the Saturday Press under Henry Clapp.

The article mentions that she, Ned Wilkins, "and the bucket of beer which Clapp used to carry into the office every afternoon" assisted Winter with the dramatic criticisms for the Saturday Press.

Emerson, Ralph Waldo (1803-1882)

Levin discusses the similarities and differences in Emerson's and Clapp's writing and ideological stances.

Fiske, Stephen Ryder (1840-1916)

Gardette, Charles Desmarais (1830-1884)

Clapp insisted that Gardette write a number of Whitman parodies for the Saturday Press.

Greeley, Horace (1811-1872)

Clapp had worked for a while with Horace Greeley in trying to popularize the doctrines of Fourier and Socialism.

Clapp helped Brisbane and Greeley "introduce Fourier's social theories in America."

Halpine, Charles Graham (1829-1868)

Henry Clapp is quoted as saying, "After the Saturday Press failed, I went on the Citizen with Miles O'Reilly."

Howells, William Dean (1837-1920)

Howland, Edward (1832-1890)

Howland succeeded Clapp as editor of the Saturday Press.

Howland Henry Clapp in the summer of 1858 and soon joined him in setting up the New York Saturday Press. Howland was in charge of the business side of the publication.

According to Winter, Clapp began the Saturday Press with Howland.

O'Brien, Fitz-James (1828-1862)

O'Brien's poetry was printed in Clapp's columns of "original" poems, which usually appeared on the first page of the Saturday Press (252).

O'Brien is mentioned as one of Clapp's assistants at the Saturday Press (7).

When Clapp began the "Saturday Press," O'Brien was hired to write about the Stage. However, Winter remarks that "O'Brien was a man to whom the curb of regular employment was intolerable," and he was only associated with the paper for a few weeks (66-67).

Winter claims that Fitz-James O'Brien's story, The Wondersmith was inspired by an anecdote that Clapp told in O'Brien and Winter's presence (69).

Pearsall, Robert W. (1833-1871)

Gunn writes how Clapp swindled money out of Pearsall to help fund the Saturday Press.

Gunn recounted that Pearsall "had his name printed in conjunction with Clapp's as 'editor and proprietor'" (140).

Described as "one of the owners of the Saturday Press."

Seymour, Charles Bailey (1829-1869)

Seymour edited the New York Weekly Review, where Henry Clapp worked from January to July of 1865 (38).

Stedman, Edmund Clarence (1833-1908)

Stoddard, Richard Henry (1825-1903)

Stoddard is described as a member of Clapp's "cabinet" in the "Kingdom of Bohemia" and at the Saturday Press (192).

Stoddard is included among one of many young writers assisted by Henry Clapp (25).

Ward, Artemus (1834-1867)

Twain claims that Artemus Ward gave Clapp the Jumping Frog story as a "present," and "Clapp put it in his Saturday Press, and it killed that paper with a suddenness that was beyond praise."

Whitman, Walt (1819-1892)

Clapp pledged to help Whitman with Leaves of Grass and published and reviewed parts of the book in the Saturday Press.

According to Howells, without Clapp's help publicizing Leaves of Grass, Whitman's book would have been hopeless.

Lalor states "without Clapp's assistance, Whitman may not have achieved the recognition he did within his lifetime."

Parry notes that Clapp helped to spread Whitman's fame and would often show him off to visitors at the bar.

Clapp became Whitman's champion for a while. Clapp's influence helped make Whitman known and "located him on the margin of literary respectability." Clapp published reviews of Whitman's work and "nursed controversies and kept Whitman in the public eye as a radical new voice."

Wilkins, Edward (Ned) G. P. (1829-1861)

Clapp and Wilkins are cited as the "organizers" the "much wondered at, admired, and sought after" group of Bohemians.

Wilkins was Clapp's chief assistant at the Saturday Press. Wilkins also wrote "a series of free dramatic and musical criticisms that were much too independent for the Herald under the pen name "Personne" in the Saturday Press. Clapp and Wilkins are cited as the "organizers" of the "much wondered at, admired, and sought after" group of Bohemians.

Winter, William (1836-1917)

William Winter told his son Jefferson that "Whenever old Clapp knew I was at work on a bit of satire he would keep vigilant guard, like a sort of grim old bird over a nestling, fending off intruders and interruptions, sucking away at an ill-smelling pipe while we were alone, and furtively and eagerly watching me out of the corner of one of his bright, glinting eyes."

friends

Arnold, George (1834-1865)

Arnold, along with Clapp and O'Brien "used to laughingly class themselves as Bohemians."

Described as "Clapp's closest friend and protege." The two men "shared a common faith in Fourierism."

According to Parry, Henry Clapp dearly loved George Arnold, and he took his death very badly.

Butler, George H. (1840-1886)

Identified as one of "the friends of Henry Clapp in the city of New York," but not necessarily a Pfaffian.

Butler is credited with contributing towards a granite monument for Clapp's grave site.

Church, William Conant (1836-1917)

Church is considered one of Clapp's "happy coterie"

Clare, Ada (1836-1874)

Delmonico, Charles Constant (1840-1884)

Identified as one of "the friends of Henry Clapp in the city of New York," but not necessarily a Pfaffian.

Delmonico is credited with contributing towards a granite monument for Clapp's grave site.

Emerson, Ralph Waldo (1803-1882)

Emerson frequented a Boston bookstore where Clapp worked as a clerk. Clapp's stories seem to indicate that the two men were somewhat friendly.

Fiske, Stephen Ryder (1840-1916)

Identified as one of "the friends of Henry Clapp in the city of New York," but not necessarily a Pfaffian.

Fisk is credited with contributing towards a granite monument for Clapp's grave site.

Greeley, Horace (1811-1872)

Clapp's opinion of Greeley was as follows: "He is a self-made man who worships his creator."

Winter states that Clapp knew Greeley well, and the two men were in Paris at the same time. Clapp described Greeley as "a self-made man that worships his creator."

McWatters, George S. (1812-1886)

McWatters was a friend of Clapp in New York, and helped to organize Clapp's funeral.

McWatters is credited with contributing towards a granite monument for Clapp's grave site.

North, William (1825-1854)

Clapp knew North intimately in London and Paris, and wrote a highly laudatory article about North after his suicide.

Describes the friendship between Clapp and North, which began in England (9).

O'Brien, Fitz-James (1828-1862)

According to Allen, in terms of debate at Pfaff's, "He was no match for the mercurial Fitz-James O'Brien, satirical George Arnold, or perhaps even his sardonic friend Henry Clapp" (270).

English claims O'Brien, Clapp, and Arnold "used to laughingly class themselves as Bohemians."

Gunn discusses the friendship between O'Brien and Henry Clapp: "O'Brien consorts with Clapp, and affects to admire his powers of conversation. Morally they are on the same level, basing their every act on utter selfishness. They swindled their landlord in this (Bleecker Street) of some hundred dollars or so and the man came to a smash in consequence. This I had from Mrs Potter. Some acquaintances of hers, seeing Clapp and O'Brien entering this house in one of their visits to Haney, warned Mrs P. against them, thinking they might design boarding with them. By the word swindling I mean they owe that amount to their unlucky entertainer" (15-16).

According to Lause, it was Clapp and O'Brien who first discovered Pfaff's in 1856 (47).

Stoddard, Richard Henry (1825-1903)

Stoddard's obituary names Clapp as one of his companions.

Whitman, Walt (1819-1892)

Clapp is mentioned as both a friend of Whitman and an advocate of his poetry.

Lalor writes that of all the people Whitman would encounter and associate with at Pfaff's, Clapp was the "individual most closely related" to him and "the most beneficial."

Clapp was most valued by Whitman during Whitman's visits to Pfaff's and during the early days of Leaves of Grass.

Whitman recalls his loyalty during early days of Leaves of Grass. Clapp and the Saturday Press were much needed allies.

groups

The Saturday Press

Clapp was eager to attract readers to the Press and published Whitman frequently.

Clapp published a letter from himself in his own Saturday Press.

Clapp is described as the Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Bohemia and the editor of the Press.

Clapp edited the Saturday Press until it ran out of money.

West 42nd St. Coterie

Clapp was one of the men and women that met at Ada Clare's house on West 42nd Street on Sunday nights. This group was referred to as Clare "coterie."

housemates

Andrews, Stephen Pearl (1812-1886)

Clapp also joined Stephen Pearl Andrews' free-love league after returning from Paris.

lovers

Clare, Ada (1836-1874)

According to Parry, Clapp was the "least active" of Clare's many admirers.

Whitman, Walt (1819-1892)

Stansell observes that the way Whitman referred to Clapp is similar to "the sort of evasion and half-glimpse which Whitman often used as a sexual code" and suggests that the two might have been lovers.