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Relationships of Arnold, George

To explore the relationships between the various bohemian writers and artists who frequented Pfaff's bar, select a person or group, and then select a relationship type. This section of the site is currently under construction; new content is being added on a regular basis.

Displaying 1 - 39 of 39
acquaintances

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey (1836-1907)

Arnold and Aldrich were familiar with each other during the days of "Literary Bohemia" in New York.

Ludlow, Fitz Hugh (1836-1870)

Arnold often described writing poems after evenings spent at Pfaff's with Ludlow.

Stoddard, Richard Henry (1825-1903)

A signed note to Stoddard appears in the collection of poetry and by and to Arnold.

Vedder, Elihu (1836-1923)

Whitman, Walt (1819-1892)

While at Pfaff's, Arnold is mentioned as being "quarrelsome" and his satirical wit was no match for Walt Whitman.

antagonists

Clapp, Henry Jr. (1814-1875)

During Arnold and Whitman's legendary fight at Pfaff's, Clapp broke his pipe pulling on Arnold's coat tail.

Whitman, Walt (1819-1892)

Arnold's toast to the "Success to the Southern Arms" leads to a response from Whitman that prompts a violent argument between the two men. Whitman ends his Pfaff's association during the Civil War after Arnold grabs his hair during this argument.

Lalor cites an "infamous incident at Pfaff's" between Whitman and the "young poet-satirist" Arnold in 1862; "None of the participants emerged with much dignity."

Parry notes Arnold's famous fight with Walt Whitman, and says it was only a matter of quick temper. However, Parry states that Whitman would later forgive Arnold for the incident.

Stansell notes that one of the political fights that occurred at Pfaff's was between Whitman and Arnold; the two men had a falling-out over some pro-Southern remarks Arnold made.

In George Arnold's war pieces written for Vanity Fair he posed as a defender of the Southern Cause. This prompted an argument later between Arnold and Walt Whitman.

"At the outbreak of the Southern rebellion Walt Whitman and George Arnold came to an unpleasantness while enjoying their usual after-dinner punch. They were sitting opposite each other at the table. George was for rebellion and Walt was opposed. George was full of 'treasonism' and Walt was full of 'patriotism.'"

collaborators

Clapp, Henry Jr. (1814-1875)

Arnold is mentioned as one of Henry Clapp's associates at Pfaff's.

Arnold is referred to as a member of Clapp's "cabinet" in the "Kingdom of Bohemia" and at the Saturday Press.

Nast, Thomas (1840-1902)

Arnold is mentioned as one of Nast's colleagues at Frank Leslie's Illustrated Paper (21-2).

friends

Clapp, Henry Jr. (1814-1875)

Arnold, along with Clapp and O'Brien "used to laughingly class themselves as Bohemians."

Described as "Clapp's closest friend and protege." The two men "shared a common faith in Fourierism."

According to Parry, Henry Clapp dearly loved George Arnold, and he took his death very badly.

Herbert, Henry William (1807-1858)

Arnold informed the men at Pfaff's of Henry Herbert's unexpected suicide.

Ludlow, Fitz Hugh (1836-1870)

Arnold himself has said that some of his poems "were written in the late hours after an evening spent in the underground Broadway resort with Fitz-Hugh Ludlow, Mortimer Thomson, the famous 'Q. K. Philander Doesticks,' and a score of like writers."

Nast, Thomas (1840-1902)

Arnold is said to have found Nast amusing, and frequently "showed him the town."

O'Brien, Fitz-James (1828-1862)

Arnold, along with Clapp and O'Brien "used to laughingly class themselves as Bohemians."

Winter consulted Arnold, who knew O'Brien before his behavior deteriorated and Arnold described his friend: "When I first knew O'Brien, in 1856-'57, he had elegant rooms; a large and valuable library; piles of manuscripts; dressing-cases; pictures; a ward-robe of much splendor; and all sorts of knick-knackery, such as young bachelors love to collect" (99-100).

Arnold was among the dinner party that O'Brien held at Delmonico's (101).

Stedman, Edmund Clarence (1833-1908)

Arnold was one of the few members of the Bohemian group that Winter claims Stedman was acquainted with. Arnold and Stedman met in childhood at "The Phalanx," at Strawberry Farms, New Jersey.

Thomson, Mortimer (1832-1875)

Arnold himself has said that some of his poems "were written in the late hours after an evening spent in the underground Broadway resort with Fitz-Hugh Ludlow, Mortimer Thomson, the famous 'Q. K. Philander Doesticks,' and a score of like writers."

Whitman, Walt (1819-1892)

Upon George Arnold's death, Whitman is said to have loved and mourned him tenderly.

Winter, William (1836-1917)

In his 1865 tribute to Fitz-James O'Brien ("O'Brien's Personal Characteristics"), George Arnold mentions that Will Winter visited him to tell him of the loss of another friend, Ned Wilkins.

Greenslet notes that "Handsome George Arnold's sincere and melodious verse was collected after his early death by Mr. Winter, in whose introduction we may read the story of his kindly, ineffective life"

from Jan. 16, 1866 column: Figaro mentions the "monument" to Arnold that will be erected in the form of Winter's book.

Winter describes him as "the most entirely beloved member" of the Bohemian group.

groups

The Saturday Press

Arnold is mentioned as a regular contributor to the Saturday Press.

Arnold is listed at one of the associates of the Saturday Press.

Arnold is mentioned as a regular contributor to the Saturday Press.

Arnold is referred to as a member of Clapp's "cabinet" in the "Kingdom of Bohemia" and at the Saturday Press.

housemates

Brisbane, Albert (1809-1890)

Brisbane ran a commune in Strawberry Farms, New Jersey, that Arnold was a part of.