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Relationships of North, William

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To explore the relationships between the various bohemian writers and artists who frequented Pfaff's bar, select a person or group, and then select a relationship type. This section of the site is currently under construction; new content is being added on a regular basis.

Displaying 1 - 23 of 23
acquaintances

Gunn mentions seeing William North in the Lantern office on three occasions: April 22, May 20, and July 1, 1852. On all three occasions, Fitz-James O'Brien was also there (95, 121, 154).

Bellew, Frank Henry Temple (1828-1888)

Bellew was a member of a New York group of artists and writers that existed before the Pfaff's Bohemians that also included Gayler, North, Eytinge, Charles G. Rosenberg, Seymour, and O'Brien.

Gayler, Charles (1820-1892)

Gayler was a member of a New York group of artists and writers that existed before the Pfaff's Bohemians that also included Eytinge, North, Bellew, Charles G. Rosenberg, Seymour, and O'Brien.

antagonists

O'Brien, Fitz-James (1828-1862)

[pages:63]

Gunn writes about plagarism controversy surrounding O'Brien and North: "Apropos of O'Brien it's said that he plagiarized the idea of his "Diamond Lens" story from North" (63).

Winter recalls that O'Brien and William North were friends, but had had a falling-out. In "The Slave of the Lamp" (later "The Man of the World"), North "described and satirized" O'Brien in the character "Fitz-Gammon O'Bouncer" (68).

Parry describes North as "the first enemy he [O'Brien] made in America, called him [O'Brien] a braggart, a borrower, and a bully" (52).

It was alleged that O'Brien had taken the "Diamond Lens" from North's papers when he committed suicide (55-6).

collaborators

Herbert, Henry William (1807-1858)

Herbert and North were both writers and "roving Englishmen." Herbert committed suicide shortly after North.

friends

Bellew, Frank Henry Temple (1828-1888)

North writes a letter to Bellew and his wife instructing them to be happy after his death by suicide.

William North writes a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Bellew before his suicide instructing them to be happy after his passing.

Clapp, Henry Jr. (1814-1875)

Clapp knew North intimately in London and Paris, and wrote a highly laudatory article about North after his suicide.

Describes the friendship between Clapp and North, which began in England (9).

Eytinge, Solomon Jr. (1833-1905)

Eytinge was a member of a New York group of artists and writers that existed before the Pfaff's Bohemians that also included Gayler, North, Bellew, Charles G. Rosenberg, Seymour, and O'Brien.

O'Brien, Fitz-James (1828-1862)

Gunn describes North as O'Brien's "crony" (27-8).

Winter recalls that O'Brien and William North were friends, but had had a falling-out (67-8).

Seymour, Charles Bailey (1829-1869)

In an article that Gunn included in his diary, Charles Seymour defended North's work, after his death, writing that the piece in question had "remained inedited up to the time of his decease, [and] I can conscientiously identify as the waif on which Mr. O'Brien has lain violent hands" (78).

Gunn identifies Seymour as the prominent defender of North's work after his death (78).

In regards to North's suicide, Seymour's argued that "[t]he cause of death was love, not poverty" (42)

Seymour "broke the news to [Frank] Bellew that North had poisoned himself over a love affair" (48).

Winter reprints a letter written by Seymour to Bellew after North's suicide and in it, Seymour describes North as a brother, alluding to the close relationship they shared (313-4).