User menu

Menu

That Club at Pfaaf's [sic]

English, Thomas Dunn. "That Club at Pfaaf's [sic]." The Literary World. 12 Jun. 1886: 202.
Type: 
magazine
Genre: 
letter to the editor
Abstract: 

English's "Letter to the Editor of the Literary World" is his attempt to dissociate himself from the Bohemian group that gathered at Pfaff's. English also attempts to dissociate Thomas Butler Gunn from this group. English's piece was written in response to Stylus's "Our New York Letter," which listed both English and Gunn as members of the "Bohemian club" at "Pfaaf's" [sic].

People who Created this Work

English, Thomas author

English's "Letter to the Editor of the Literary World" is his attempt to dissociate himself with the Bohemians at Pfaff's.

People Mentioned in this Work

Arnold, George [pages:202]

English claims O'Brien, Clapp, and Arnold "used to laughingly class themselves as Bohemians, speak of Pfaff, his beer; but they spoke of no club" (202). English states, "I remember very well saying to one of these gentlemen, with a feeble attempt at pleasantry -- 'As there are so many buyers of beer among your people it is quite proper that you should have a cellar to receive you'" (202).

Butler, William [pages:202]

English dissociates himself from Butler, mentioned as one of English's "associates" at Pfaff's in "Our New York."

Clapp, Henry [pages:202]

English claims O'Brien, Clapp, and Arnold "used to laughingly class themselves as Bohemians, speak of Pfaff, his beer; but they spoke of no club" (202). English states, "I remember very well saying to one of these gentlemen, with a feeble attempt at pleasantry -- 'As there are so many buyers of beer among your people it is quite proper that you should have a cellar to receive you'" (202).

Clark, Horace [pages:202]

English dissociates himself from Clark, mentioned as one of English's "associates" at Pfaff's in "Our New York."

English, Thomas [pages:202]

English's "Letter to the Editor of the Literary World" is his attempt to disassociate himself with the Bohemians at Pfaff's. English states, "I was not a member of such an association, nor have I been connected with any social club in New York -- except, for a short time, with the Author's; nor was I ever in Pfaaf's, or Pfaff's, in my life. I am not quite sure where it was" (202).

English dissociates himself from Sothern, Clark, Butler, and Mackenzie. This letter was written as a reponse to "Our New York."

Gunn, Thomas [pages:202]

English mentions that Gunn was also mentioned as a frequenter of Pfaff's in the "Our New York" piece. English claims to know Gunn as he was a steady contributor to "a New York journal" to which English was also "connected." English states, "He was a correct, upright, and decorous gentleman, anything but a Bohemian, as the term is generally understood. He never spoke of such a club to me" (202).

Mackenzie, Robert [pages:202]

English dissociates himself from Mackenzie, mentioned as one of English's "associates" at Pfaff's in "Our New York."

O'Brien, Fitz-James [pages:202]

English claims O'Brien, Clapp, and Arnold "used to laughingly class themselves as Bohemians, speak of Pfaff, his beer; but they spoke of no club" (202). English states, "I remember very well saying to one of these gentlemen, with a feeble attempt at pleasantry -- 'As there are so many buyers of beer among your people it is quite proper that you should have a cellar to receive you'" (202).

Pfaff, Charles [pages:202]

English claims O'Brien, Clapp, and Arnold "used to laughingly class themselves as Bohemians, speak of Pfaff, his beer; but they spoke of no club" (202).

English states, "I have a notion that Pfaff's place was in a basement, a sort of underground eating-house and beer-room. I remember very well saying to one of these gentlemen, with a feeble attempt at pleasantry -- 'As there are so many buyers of beer among your people it is quite proper that you should have a cellar to receive you.' But as far as my personal knowledge goes, the place may have been in a garret" (202).

Sothern, Edward [pages:202]

English dissociates himself from Sothern, mentioned as one of English's "associates" at Pfaff's in "Our New York."